Why does everybody love chocolate?


Chocolate. It’s everywhere right now as the shops try to tempt you into buying all sorts of delicious goodies in the lead-up to Easter. With so many temptations around, let’s look at why we love chocolate so much. Continue reading


The role of relationships in happiness


We tend to reach for happiness as one of our goals, whether consciously or subconsciously. A Harvard study that follows men over the course of their lives from their teenage years has been running since 1938, and provides many insights, but primarily – fame and fortune don’t cut it. Continue reading

In the land where the stars twinkle


Picture of the Trifid Nebula, taken by SALT

Situated close to the small town of Sutherland in the middle of the Karoo is a plateau covered in telescopes. Looking from afar, it almost appears to be a mummy telescope and her babies, since one of the telescopes is significantly bigger than the rest. This telescope is SALT – the Southern African Large Telescope, and at 11m across, it is the largest optical telescope in the Southern Hemisphere. Continue reading


Art, spring flowers, and the discovery of a blue halo


I have a sketch book, or as it was marketed, a visual journal. I think I prefer the name visual journal – each picture was something I chose to draw, not something that was put in front of me as in art class, and each picture has an added dimension of having a memory attached to it. And, as it turns out, sometimes a picture will end up having some form of scientific relevance too, as happened with my picture of spring flowers. Continue reading


The first man to be cured of HIV


He wasn’t born to be a public speaker. A slight man, he stood before us, telling his story. He was the first man to be cured of HIV.  It wasn’t the conventional approach to a cure. This man, Timothy Ray Brown, also popularly known as the “Berlin Patient” had been cured of HIV as a by-product of being treated for leukaemia. Continue reading


Rainwater harvesting – tapping into a greatly underused resource

This article is specific to the context of the Cape Town drought, but the concepts can be applied in any water-scarce situation where there is the potential to harvest rainwater.cropped-rain.jpgAs you’ve probably heard, over and over if you live in Cape Town, dam levels are low. At 31% capacity, water storage levels are 25% lower than they were this time last year.  Although there are talks of shipping water from upcountry, and building a desalination plant, perhaps we should be looking to the skies – which deliver fresh water right into our backyard.

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Greywater: the do’s and don’ts of reusing greywater at home


Catch your shower water in a bucket for later reuse. Photo credit: peasap

It’s winter in the Cape, and although I’ve enjoyed having a longer period of warm sunny days this year, even I have to admit that I’ve been hoping for a good wet winter after the drought. For a city right next to the sea, it’s amazing how we can be so affected by a drought season. But here we are, and as we look for ways to use less water, many are turning to greywater recycling. While this is great, greywater cannot be handled in the same way as municipal water, and health risks can arise from simple mistakes. If you’ve wondered about that smell as you water the lawn, or the colour of the water you’ve been storing, you may be doing something wrong with how you use greywater. Continue reading